Futuristic solar home hidden inside 18th-century stone ruins – Inhabitat

The stone ruins of an 18th-century Scottish farmhouse have been introduced again to life because the envelope for a surprisingly fashionable solar-powered home. Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio crafted Spoil Studio with layers like a palimpsest, from the 200-year-outdated farmhouse body to futuristic and tubular inside shell. Along with the usage of photovoltaics, the dwelling was constructed to close passivhaus requirements and boasts a brilliant-insulated envelope.


Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

This uncommon home situated within the distant Scottish countryside retains an outwardly rural look with a pitched roof and exterior stone partitions. As a substitute of utilizing timber for the pitched envelope, nevertheless, the architects clad the construction in black waterproofing EDPM rubber. Stranger nonetheless is the pair of inside curved shells, inserted inside the rubber-clad envelope, fabricated from insulating recycled polystyrene blocks and lined with glass-bolstered plastic. These white futuristic “tubes” function hallways connecting the centrally situated communal areas with the bedrooms situated on both finish of the home.

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

“Emphasizing the narrative of time, these three layers additionally replicate totally different architectural expressions: the random pure erosion of stone partitions, an archetypical minimalist pitched roof, and a free type double curved floor,” wrote the architects. “These three layers usually are not designed as unbiased elements, quite, they tackle that means as their relationship evolves by way of the constructing’s sections. They separate, come collectively, and intertwine, making a sequence of architectural singularities, revealing simultaneous studying of time and area.”

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Related: Barn ruins transformed into contemporary home with spa

Natural light fills the predominately white inside and huge home windows body views of the Scottish countryside. The furnishings are saved minimalist and are largely constructed from gentle-coloured wooden; gridded timber bookshelves situated within the tube adhere to the curved partitions. Parts of authentic stone partitions are introduced into the home.

+ Nathanael Dorent Architecture

By way of ArchDaily

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

Ruin Studio by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio, adaptive reuse farmhouse, Scottish passivhaus, farmhouse ruins turned into modern home, Ruin Studio in Scotland,

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Futuristic solar home hidden inside 18th-century stone ruins - Inhabitat